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The day science quietly killed religion

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115 thoughts on “The day science quietly killed religion

  1. If you’ve got a copy of Asimov’s The Stars In Their Course, there’s a great essay in it—The Fateful Lightning—in which he makes the same point.

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      • I think it is only in this area they were so ahead of their time. Having realized the phantoms they worshiped were without body or form and were said to dwell in space, wireless comm was required and it was urgent so the brains got working and that was the solution, it has just been improved over time

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      • We at Heavenly Communication™ ISP are aware of your wireless connection failure. This problem was reported at 12:00 April 24: 31 CE. A new router will be dispatched within three working millennia. Until then, please use the LAN cable supplied with your Paradise™ router.

        Thank you for your patience

        St Peter (Manager, customer services division)

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    • Demonstrates a certain lack of confidence, wouldn’t you say?

      Was just reading your exchange with Theo. Was out yesterday so i had to catch up. You have to question if these people are actually sane, don’t you?

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      • He starts off all erudite and straight down the line, then as soon as one offers the thinnest of lines he is like a pensioner’s Yorkie: dives for your ankles yapping all his religious bullshit. One is tempted to kick him in the balls but his argument is so bloody hairy and he moves so much you can’t get a decent boot in.

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      • To tell you the truth i can’t even figure out what the hell he’s saying about worldview and how i MUST accept his Christian theistic view. It’s off the scales on my BULLSHITO’DOMETER.

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      • It might be a difficult call but people of his ilk contribute nothing to rational discussion.
        They are mini-Prayson’s.
        If a point cannot be got across in a few paragraphs using ordinary common sense lauguar then something is fundamentally wrong with their argument.

        Atheist bloggers are used to this type of bullshit, but how can these people relate to ordinary christians for the gods sake?

        Could you imagine a Theo, Unklee or Prayson in the pulpit? How about them talking to their kids!
        Shudders…

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      • Well, apparently i’ve had to submit to his worldview just so he can answer a rather simple question: how do you explain jesus not knowing Moses didn’t exist? You’d think that was a fairly straightforward question, right? SEVEN comments later he still hasn’t answered…. It’s not normal behaviour.

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      • I believe he, like PeW, demeans the websites he visits.
        I am in two minds as to ban such idiots or immediately delete their comment if they are not straight – as I began to do with Mark and PeW.
        It prevents them monopolizing a post with crap.
        Step up to the plate and answer the damned question or get deleted.
        Not everyone’s cup of tea, of course.

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      • Well, the post was about him so i’d be being an asshole if i edited him out. Still, i actually think these people do their religions such a disservice that we should only encourage them to talk.

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      • I am probably angry fr this reason…they do not answer questions put to them, hence my desire to zap them into Spam Heaven.
        The only hope is that some regain a measure of sanity like bloggers Marcus and Nate.

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      • I only delete the unnecessarily foul and offensive (haven’t done it yet, but—)

        In the meantime if some raving lunatic publicly declares himself, who are we to gainsay him? Her? It? Let ’em rave, I say: “by the fruits of their labours shall thee know them” (or however it goes, I’m a bit rusty).

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    • Have to jump in here and give a big ‘tut tut’ to Ark for deleting comments! I think this proves that PeW and Mark have trumped you and you’re afraid for anyone to see it …. otherwise, clearly, you would have left them.

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      • Er….no. It was because after repeated requests to a) stick to the topic and b) answer the specific question they continued to meander around the countryside and refused to offer any sane reasonable answer. Therefore I chucked them in the bin,…..where rubbish should go.

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      • Maybe you are right…perhaps you ought to take over and use your undeniable theological debating skills and in depth awareness of Mosaic Law and encyclopaedic knowledge of Abrahamic religions to demonstrate to all these reborn evangelical plonkers why they need to read
        a science book.

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    • Ha! True. I was reading through your exchange with Theo this morning. You don’t need to hear it from me, but your patience in the face of such absurdity was impressive.

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  2. It’s more than lightning rods that betray a believers faith. Every time they fasten a seatbelt they make the statement that they do not have faith that God will protect them. Each time they take a medication prescribed by their doctor the Bible goes out the window. Of course, every time they go to work they reveal their lack of faith that the Lord will provide for them.

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    • True. I always liked this extract from Scott Adams’, God’s Debris:

      “Very few people believe in God,” he replied.
      I didn’t see how he could deny the obvious. “Of course
      they do. Billions of people believe in God.”
      The old man leaned toward me, resting a blanketed
      elbow on the arm of his rocker.
      “Four billion people say they believe in God, but few
      genuinely believe. If people believed in God, they would
      live every minute of their lives in support of that belief. Rich
      people would give their wealth to the needy. Everyone
      would be frantic to determine which religion was the true
      one. No one could be comfortable in the thought that they
      might have picked the wrong religion and blundered into
      eternal damnation, or bad reincarnation, or some other
      unthinkable consequence. People would dedicate their lives
      to converting others to their religions.
      “A belief in God would demand one hundred percent
      obsessive devotion, influencing every waking moment of
      this brief life on earth. But your four billion so-called believers
      do not live their lives in that fashion, except for a few.
      The majority believe in the usefulness of their beliefs—an
      earthly and practical utility—but they do not believe in the
      underlying reality.”

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    • For some reason this reminds me of those Jews who wrap themselves in giant plastic bags when flying in commercial aircraft—apparently doing so makes flying over the graveyards six miles below somehow ‘kosher’ (if that’s the right word?).

      Plays merry hell with the sensitivities of the aircrew and fellow passengers though.

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  3. And there was me thinking that religion slowly committed suicide, one of whose limbs fell off and reincarnated first into a bunch of fat hairy toffs and then into the science that we all know and love…

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      • Are you sure about that? You mean alternate to your proposed one, which of course is just as likely in the great scheme of things. I’m sure Veles is proud 🙂

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      • Veles inhabits an odd landscape. I like to visit from time to time but its way up there on the Bizarro scale. Up is down, left is right, rabbits are unicorns, and T’s are K’s. Still, he has a kickass home theater system and we like to watch the alternate universes play out… and mess with them sometimes. He’s good like that.

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      • Ha… that must be what happened then, I must have turned to the wrong page in my Multiversal Encyclopaedia Brittanica… your version is of course the correct one! They really should make it into an e-book, instead of the almost infinite volumes that take up…actually I’m not really sure what room or reality their in…. maybe past the sign marked “Not this Way”

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      • In 1984 York minster was ablaze. It was thought it had been struck by lightning or had had an electrical fault, but the idea which came to the front was it was god’s revenge. Not long before the fire David Jenkins was consecrated as bishop of Durham and he held some so-called radical views.

        A Quote from wiki
        David Jenkins’ selection as Bishop of Durham in 1984 was controversial due to allegations that he held heterodox beliefs. His “conjuring trick with bones” comment, about the resurrection of Christ, was criticised in particular, though some have argued that he was misquoted. The original line appears to have been “[the Resurrection] is real. That’s the point. All I said was ‘literally physical’. I was very careful in the use of language. After all, a conjuring trick with bones proves only that somebody’s very clever at a conjuring trick with bones.” [11] He had stated on other occasions his view that the resurrected Christ lacked a physical body.

        Three days after his consecration as bishop on 6 July 1984, York Minster was struck by lightning, resulting in a disastrous fire which some interpreted as a sign of divine wrath at Jenkins’s appointment.[12]

        Aren’t they all daft !

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    • Is it not possible that Big G was aiming at a nearby mosque but didn’t allow enough deflection for a moving target? Don’t forget that they may be static to us but He sees the bigger picture. (And poor ol’ Fella is getting on a bit now … new glasses?)

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    • Religion is compatible with science with the same way that water is compatible with a leaky roof. It can squeeze nicely through the cracks, but every hole that gets fixed leaves less room for gods.

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    • Just had to look her up. Sounds like a fine human being, more power to her… but that doesn’t make her a friend of science. The reason science and religion conflict is because they use entirely different methods of deciding what information correctly describes reality, and what is incorrect. It’s perfectly valid to use any method to come up with an idea about how reality works, including revelation. Scientists have revelations all the time, although probably not from a supernatural source. The difference is in how you decide whether it is nonsense. Religion relies on authority. If the information is from someone important (god, pope, priest, parent, bible) it is true. Science relies on falsification. If the information can be falsified, but isn’t, it isn’t “true” but rather it is temporarily and conditionally correct and useful, at least until it will later be shown to be somewhat or completely false. When that happens, it will be corrected, making it more accurate, not less.

      Science, therefore, progresses by being wrong, and religion can’t possibly be wrong. Scientists attempt to correct older ideas including their own, by pointing out what is wrong with them. Religion attempts at all cost to show that it isn’t wrong, because once it is conclusively demonstrated that any detail is wrong, the whole authority house of cards collapses.

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      • ” If the information is from someone important (god, pope, priest, parent, bible) it is true.” This is not how it’s done in the Episcopal Church, in fact Bart Erdman books are sometimes taught. I’ve heard priests say the Bible is myth, and that’s ok because myth can run deeper than true story.

        Further, in my theology studies I had to bone up on simplified logic and certain math and science principles to even begin to read some texts. It’s impossible to approach Phil. of Religion w/o scientific principles in one’s context.

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      • ok, scanned the article. I don’t know if the discovery proves anything to me I don’t already believe or that isn’t obvious: something is keeping me from falling of the edge of the earth. My body works, it heals itself, etc etc on this we all agree. I call this “God” others call it science (for me, same as God) others intelligent design. Whatever “it” is I’m glad it’s working and I’m joyful for the new discoveries out there in the Universe. I’ve always believed there’s more than one. Thanks. (BTW “Proof of Heaven” by the unbelieving neuroscientist who died and experienced otherwise an interesting case.)

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  4. It was a beautiful sunny day
    Not a gray cloud was in sight
    The preacher said let’s pray
    Give thanks to the Lord for light

    As on their knees they knelt
    Loud thunder began to sound
    Hard rain begin to pelt
    All words of prayer were drowned

    The preacher raised his voice
    Give thanks now unto our God
    Sing praises and rejoice
    To him for the lightning rod

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  5. Reblogged this on paarsurrey and commented:
    Paarsurrey says:
    Religion has not been killed. It is still alive. Revealed religion covers ethical, moral and spiritual aspects of life; science covers the physical and material. They both complement one another; they are not contradictory.

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